Zavvi - The Home of Pop Culture

PAURA explores the horror repertoire from the precious CAM Sugar archives taking us on a hypnotic journey into the labyrinths of fear, through the different variations that Italian horror took on from the esoteric and supernatural to the slasher films of the early 1970s; to reinterpretations of Romantic literature and gothic fiction to the splatter films of the ‘80s; and from witchcraft to metropolitan horror

This is not a real “best of” but an eclectic menu full of mysterious voices, childlike lullabies, sweet melodies, obsessive music boxes, obstinate harpsichords, crazy distortions and threatening synthesizers, conceived as a succession of sequences, as if a film edit

The new collection includes some of the most creative music every written and strives to do justice not only to some of the best known composers in this genre, but also to many great unsung composers: From celebrated composers like Ennio Morricone, Riz Ortolani & Stelvio Cipriani to long-forgotten personalities who fed the industrial backbone of Italian cinema such as Daniele Patucchi, Marcelo Giombini & Berto Pisano

  • Includes 6 previously unreleased tracks plus 3 tracks released on vinyl for the first time and 5 tracks available commercially for the first time (originally released only as a limited promo item).
  • Highlights include Mario Bava’s Reazione a Catena which inspired John Carpenter’s Halloween and Sam Raimi’s The Evil Dead; Armando Crispino’s L’Etrusco uccide ancora, Joe D’Amato’s La Morte ha sorriso all’assassino and Rosso Sangue and Un’Ombra nell’Ombra featuring the legendary prog rock band GOBLIN (known for setting Dario Argento’s giallo masterpieces such as Profondo Rosso to music).

No genre has won an audience so vast and devoted as Italian horror. It’s hard to find another genre with such iconic, powerful and visionary imagery. Between the late 1950s and mid-1980s, made-in-Italy horror cinema fascinated the world before long becoming the main competitor of American cinema. Its influence on international culture has consolidated over time, turning some of its best directors, such as Riccardo Freda, Mario Bava or Aristide Massaccesi (aka Joe D'Amato) into true cult auteurs, who inspired several generations of American and European directors: from Brian De Palma to Martin Scorsese, from Joe Dante to Eli Roth, from Tim Burton to Sam Raimi, from Pedro Almodóvar to John Carpenter, to Nicolas Winding Refn and Quentin Tarantino.

Like the films themselves, their soundtracks have been collected and venerated over the years by a cult fandom across the globe. The charm of these films & scores is that they were often artisanal, created on a low-budget, and had a sense of underground. The plots are wrapped in a dark spiral of unhealthy and esoteric scents, while the logic of the narrative succumbs, crushed by the disturbing violence of the visuals, surrendering to the film direction, photography and its unique and extraordinary music.

This is the true hallmark of Italian horror, that quality that makes it unique and legendary even today; eternal and imperturbable despite changing fashions and the flow of time.

Track Listing:

  • 6 previously unreleased tracks
  • 3 tracks for the first time on vinyl
  • 5 tracks issued commercially for the first time (originally released only as a limited promo)

A:

  1. Ennio Morricone – Mio Caro Assassino from MIO CARO ASSASSINO (My Dear Killer) (1971)
  2. Bruno Nicolai feat. Edda Dell’Orso – La Notte che Evelyn Uscì dalla Tomba (Long Version)
  3. from LA NOTTE CHE EVELYN USCÌ DALLA TOMBA (The Night Evelyn Came Out Of The Grave) (1971)
  4. Bruno Nicolai – La Dama Rossa Uccide Sette Volte (Edit) from LA DAMA ROSSA UCCIDE SETTE VOLTE (The Red Queen Kills Seven Times) (1972)
  5. Stelvio Cipriani – Tribal Shake from REAZIONE A CATENA (A Bay Of Blood) (1971)
  6. Stelvio Cipriani – Il Sesso del Diavolo (Finale) from IL SESSO DEL DIAVOLO (Sex Of The Devil) (1971) 
  7. Stelvio Cipriani – Deviation from DEVIATION (1971)

B:

  1. Riz Ortolani – L’Etrusco Uccide Ancora (Titoli) from L’ETRUSCO UCCIDE ANCORA (The Dead Are Alive!) (1972)
  2. Daniele Patucchi – Giallo in Tensione from FRANKENSTEIN ’80 (1974)  *
  3. Ennio Morricone feat. Edda Dell’Orso – Ansimando from MACCHIE SOLARI (Autopsy) (1974)
  4. Manuel De Sica – Black Dream from MYSTERY TOUR (1985)  †
  5. P. Gatti, A. Zenga – Cerro Torre from CESARE MAESTRI: IL RAGNO DELLE DOLOMITI (1980)  †
  6. Berto Pisano – Greta from LA MORTE HA SORRISO ALL’ASSASSINO (Death Smiles On A Murderer) (1973)
  7. Sante Maria Romitelli – Bambola Sensuale from LA ROSSA DALLA PELLE CHE SCOTTA (The Sensuous Doll) (1972)  *

C:

  1. Adolfo Waitzman – Languidamente from PENSIONE PAURA (Hotel Fear) (1978)
  2. Nico Fidenco – Il Demonio in Convento from IMMAGINI DI UN CONVENTO (Images In A Convent) (1979)°
  3. Ettore De Carolis – Ettore De Carolis (Flavour of Death) from IL CAVALIERE, LA MORTE E IL DIAVOLO (1983)†
  4. Marcello Giombini – Un Gioco per Eveline from UN GIOCO PER EVELINE (1971)*
  5. Carlo Maria Cordio – Absurd from ROSSO SANGUE (1981)
  6. Stelvio Cipriani (performed by Goblin) – Devil Dance from UN’OMBRA NELL’OMBRA (Ring Of Darkness) (1979)
  7. Daniele Patucchi – E Tanta Paura from E TANTA PAURA (Plot Of Fear) (1976) *
  8. Marcello Giombini – Orinoco: Prigioniere del Sesso from ORINOCO: PRIGIONIERE DEL SESSO (1980)

D:

  1. Franco Micalizzi – Bargain With The Devil #3 from CHI SEI? (Beyond The Door) (1974)°
  2. Stefano Liberati – The Prophecy (Vers. A) from I PENSIERI DELL’OCCHIO (1978)†
  3. Luigi Ceccarelli – Walking Through The Shadows from DIFENDIMI DALLA NOTTE (1981)†
  4. Daniele Patucchi – Minaccia Sulla Città from BELVE FEROCI (Wild Beasts) (1984)
Artist:
Various Artists
Brand:
CAM Sugar

Paura - A Hypnotic Sonic Journey Into The Labyrinth Of Fear 2LP Splatter

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Zavvi - The Home of Pop Culture

PAURA explores the horror repertoire from the precious CAM Sugar archives taking us on a hypnotic journey into the labyrinths of fear, through the different variations that Italian horror took on from the esoteric and supernatural to the slasher films of the early 1970s; to reinterpretations of Romantic literature and gothic fiction to the splatter films of the ‘80s; and from witchcraft to metropolitan horror

This is not a real “best of” but an eclectic menu full of mysterious voices, childlike lullabies, sweet melodies, obsessive music boxes, obstinate harpsichords, crazy distortions and threatening synthesizers, conceived as a succession of sequences, as if a film edit

The new collection includes some of the most creative music every written and strives to do justice not only to some of the best known composers in this genre, but also to many great unsung composers: From celebrated composers like Ennio Morricone, Riz Ortolani & Stelvio Cipriani to long-forgotten personalities who fed the industrial backbone of Italian cinema such as Daniele Patucchi, Marcelo Giombini & Berto Pisano

  • Includes 6 previously unreleased tracks plus 3 tracks released on vinyl for the first time and 5 tracks available commercially for the first time (originally released only as a limited promo item).
  • Highlights include Mario Bava’s Reazione a Catena which inspired John Carpenter’s Halloween and Sam Raimi’s The Evil Dead; Armando Crispino’s L’Etrusco uccide ancora, Joe D’Amato’s La Morte ha sorriso all’assassino and Rosso Sangue and Un’Ombra nell’Ombra featuring the legendary prog rock band GOBLIN (known for setting Dario Argento’s giallo masterpieces such as Profondo Rosso to music).

No genre has won an audience so vast and devoted as Italian horror. It’s hard to find another genre with such iconic, powerful and visionary imagery. Between the late 1950s and mid-1980s, made-in-Italy horror cinema fascinated the world before long becoming the main competitor of American cinema. Its influence on international culture has consolidated over time, turning some of its best directors, such as Riccardo Freda, Mario Bava or Aristide Massaccesi (aka Joe D'Amato) into true cult auteurs, who inspired several generations of American and European directors: from Brian De Palma to Martin Scorsese, from Joe Dante to Eli Roth, from Tim Burton to Sam Raimi, from Pedro Almodóvar to John Carpenter, to Nicolas Winding Refn and Quentin Tarantino.

Like the films themselves, their soundtracks have been collected and venerated over the years by a cult fandom across the globe. The charm of these films & scores is that they were often artisanal, created on a low-budget, and had a sense of underground. The plots are wrapped in a dark spiral of unhealthy and esoteric scents, while the logic of the narrative succumbs, crushed by the disturbing violence of the visuals, surrendering to the film direction, photography and its unique and extraordinary music.

This is the true hallmark of Italian horror, that quality that makes it unique and legendary even today; eternal and imperturbable despite changing fashions and the flow of time.

Track Listing:

  • 6 previously unreleased tracks
  • 3 tracks for the first time on vinyl
  • 5 tracks issued commercially for the first time (originally released only as a limited promo)

A:

  1. Ennio Morricone – Mio Caro Assassino from MIO CARO ASSASSINO (My Dear Killer) (1971)
  2. Bruno Nicolai feat. Edda Dell’Orso – La Notte che Evelyn Uscì dalla Tomba (Long Version)
  3. from LA NOTTE CHE EVELYN USCÌ DALLA TOMBA (The Night Evelyn Came Out Of The Grave) (1971)
  4. Bruno Nicolai – La Dama Rossa Uccide Sette Volte (Edit) from LA DAMA ROSSA UCCIDE SETTE VOLTE (The Red Queen Kills Seven Times) (1972)
  5. Stelvio Cipriani – Tribal Shake from REAZIONE A CATENA (A Bay Of Blood) (1971)
  6. Stelvio Cipriani – Il Sesso del Diavolo (Finale) from IL SESSO DEL DIAVOLO (Sex Of The Devil) (1971) 
  7. Stelvio Cipriani – Deviation from DEVIATION (1971)

B:

  1. Riz Ortolani – L’Etrusco Uccide Ancora (Titoli) from L’ETRUSCO UCCIDE ANCORA (The Dead Are Alive!) (1972)
  2. Daniele Patucchi – Giallo in Tensione from FRANKENSTEIN ’80 (1974)  *
  3. Ennio Morricone feat. Edda Dell’Orso – Ansimando from MACCHIE SOLARI (Autopsy) (1974)
  4. Manuel De Sica – Black Dream from MYSTERY TOUR (1985)  †
  5. P. Gatti, A. Zenga – Cerro Torre from CESARE MAESTRI: IL RAGNO DELLE DOLOMITI (1980)  †
  6. Berto Pisano – Greta from LA MORTE HA SORRISO ALL’ASSASSINO (Death Smiles On A Murderer) (1973)
  7. Sante Maria Romitelli – Bambola Sensuale from LA ROSSA DALLA PELLE CHE SCOTTA (The Sensuous Doll) (1972)  *

C:

  1. Adolfo Waitzman – Languidamente from PENSIONE PAURA (Hotel Fear) (1978)
  2. Nico Fidenco – Il Demonio in Convento from IMMAGINI DI UN CONVENTO (Images In A Convent) (1979)°
  3. Ettore De Carolis – Ettore De Carolis (Flavour of Death) from IL CAVALIERE, LA MORTE E IL DIAVOLO (1983)†
  4. Marcello Giombini – Un Gioco per Eveline from UN GIOCO PER EVELINE (1971)*
  5. Carlo Maria Cordio – Absurd from ROSSO SANGUE (1981)
  6. Stelvio Cipriani (performed by Goblin) – Devil Dance from UN’OMBRA NELL’OMBRA (Ring Of Darkness) (1979)
  7. Daniele Patucchi – E Tanta Paura from E TANTA PAURA (Plot Of Fear) (1976) *
  8. Marcello Giombini – Orinoco: Prigioniere del Sesso from ORINOCO: PRIGIONIERE DEL SESSO (1980)

D:

  1. Franco Micalizzi – Bargain With The Devil #3 from CHI SEI? (Beyond The Door) (1974)°
  2. Stefano Liberati – The Prophecy (Vers. A) from I PENSIERI DELL’OCCHIO (1978)†
  3. Luigi Ceccarelli – Walking Through The Shadows from DIFENDIMI DALLA NOTTE (1981)†
  4. Daniele Patucchi – Minaccia Sulla Città from BELVE FEROCI (Wild Beasts) (1984)
Artist:
Various Artists
Brand:
CAM Sugar
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